Sculptor Kent Ullberg's "The Guardian" Commissioned to Grace New Michael Graves-designed Federal Reserve Bank in Houston

Sculptor Kent Ullberg, who works out of studios in Loveland, Colorado and Corpus Christi, Texas, has been chosen as the winning artist in a competition to select a sculpture for the entry plaza at the new Federal Reserve Bank building at 1801 Allen Parkway in Houston. The contest was judged by Federal Reserve representatives and Michael Graves, the building's architect and the recipient of the 2001 American Institute of Architects Gold Medal.

(PRWEB) February 7, 2005 -- Sculptor Kent Ullberg, who works out of studios in Loveland, Colorado and Corpus Christi, Texas, has been chosen as the winning artist in a competition to select a sculpture for the main entrance of the new Federal Reserve Bank building at 1801 Allen Parkway in Houston. The contest was judged by Federal Reserve representatives and Michael Graves, the building's architect and the recipient of the 2001 American Institute of Architects Gold Medal.

Judges commissioned Ullberg's "The Guardian," which depicts a perched eagle with its wings spread wide. The massive piece, 12 feet tall and 20 feet wide, will be installed atop an 18-foot column at the main entrance to the building. The piece is now being cast at Art Castings of Colorado in Loveland, Colorado (www.artcastings.com), and will be dedicated the first week of June.

The building, a branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, was designed by Graves in cooperation with Houston-based architectural firm Pierce Goodwin Alexander and Linville (PGAL). Graves was selected after a nationwide search for an architect whose work would reflect the site’s historic location within the Fourth Ward and near the Buffalo Bayou, as well as the broader regional architecture. Linbeck Construction Co. of Houston is supervising construction, which is expected to be completed this summer.

This branch of the Dallas Fed, the site of the former Jefferson Davis Hospital, replaces the agency's current facility on San Jacinto Street. Fed representatives note that Graves was selected for his talent for focusing on historical context within the urban environment, and he has designed a building that will be a monumental yet approachable focal point for all of Houston. The building helps create a gateway to Houston's downtown, and is designed to capture the multicultural, international and industrial traditions of a contemporary city while staying loyal to the classical foundations of the Federal Reserve System. The Dallas Fed serves the Eleventh Federal Reserve District, which encompasses Texas, northern Louisiana and southern New Mexico, and also has branches in San Antonio and El Paso.

Houston art lovers will have the chance to enjoy more of Ullberg's work this summer and fall, when a retrospective exhibit featuring 48 pieces from throughout his career will be on display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science from August 15th until October 30th.

About Kent Ullberg
A native of Sweden, Kent Ullberg is recognized as one of the world’s foremost wildlife sculptors. While he has done hundreds of works on a small scale, he is perhaps best known for the monumental works he has executed for museums and municipalities from Omaha, Nebraska to Cape Town, South Africa. His Fort Lauderdale, Florida and Omaha, Nebraska installations are the largest wildlife bronze compositions ever done, spanning several city blocks. Regardless of scale, he imbues all of his subjects with unparalleled vitality.

Ullberg is a member of a number of important art organizations that have honored him with prestigious awards. These include, in New York City, Allied Artists of America, National Academy of Design, National Arts Club, National Sculpture Society and the Society of Animal Artists. The National Academy of Design elected Ullberg a full “Academician,” one of the highest recognitions a visual artist can receive. His memberships and awards outside New York include the American Society of Marine Artists, Ambler, Pennsylvania; and the National Academy of Western Art, Oklahoma City, which awarded him the Prix de West Award in 1998, the foremost award in western art. He is a major supporter of many wildlife conservation efforts.

Ullberg’s work can be found in major museums and corporate headquarters around the globe, including the National Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, Sweden; the National Gallery in Botswana, Africa; National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.; Exhibition Hall, Beijing, China; the Guildhall in London, and many more. His pieces can also be found in the private collections of world leaders and celebrities, including H.R.H. Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, Jack Nicholson and Robert Wagner. He maintains studios in Loveland, Colorado and Corpus Christi, Texas. For more information, call (970) 667-7809 or (361) 851-1600, or email e-mail protected from spam bots.

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Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2005/2/prweb205698.htm